Unique Clinical Services at UA-Banner Children’s Postinfectious Autoimmune Encephalopathy Center Highlighted in New Video

The CPAE Clinic is currently accepting patients from around the world. Now in its second year of treating patients, the CPAE clinic has already attracted patients from all corners of the United States, Mexico and Thailand. Plans are underway to open a second clinic in Phoenix at Banner – Cardon Children’s Medical Center this spring.

A new video highlights the unique services provided at the Children’s Postinfectious Autoimmune Encephalopathy (CPAE) Center of Excellence at the University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center.

This one-of-a-kind pediatric clinic treats children with CPAE and is housed within Banner – Diamond Children’s Multispecialty Clinic.

“We want to get the word out that we are accepting patients from all parts of North America and the rest of the world,” said clinic co-director and developmental behavioral pediatrician, Sydney Rice, MD, MSc, associate professor.

Now in its second year, the CPAE clinic has attracted patients from all corners of the United States, as well as Mexico and Thailand. Plans are underway to open a second clinic in Phoenix at Banner – Cardon Children’s Medical Center this spring.

The CPAE team has created a FAQ handout that provides details on how parents can make an appointment for their child, while answering other common questions.

What is CPAE?
CPAE is a perplexing, challenging and often devastating spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. It occurs when a child’s immune system, while fighting off a virus or infection, mistakenly targets the brain, causing inflammation, resulting in a range of symptoms, which typically occur abruptly—often overnight. Some of the symptoms include: obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD), tics, restrictive eating, severe anxiety, frequent urination and changes in handwriting.

Two common types of CPAE are PANS (Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome) and PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections).

“CPAE is particularly challenging to treat,” said Michael Daines, MD, clinic co-director and pediatric immunologist.   “The inflammation is only part of the whole picture, which is why we need a team of specialists to treat this spectrum of diseases.”

The core team of specialists includes experts in pediatric immunology, developmental and behavioral pediatrics, psychiatry, neurology, psychology and nursing support.

“We’re excited about providing real help to children with CPAE, and hope to reach those who have not been able to find the help they need,” said Dr. Rice.

“The CPAE clinic is truly unique, bringing together pediatric specialists from across disciplines to provide the help that children with these complex disorders need,” said Fayez K. Ghishan, MD, director of the UA Steele Center and physician-in-chief of Banner Children’s – Diamond Children’s Medical Center.

About the CPAE Center of Excellence
The Children’s Postinfectious Autoimmune Encephalopathy (CPAE) Center of Excellence at the UA Steele Children’s Research Center is the first of its kind in the world to offer an integrated model of clinical care, research and education. It was established through a collaboration between the UA Steele Children’s Research Center and Banner Health.

For more information, please visit the center’s website: www.cpaecenter.arizona.edu

About the UA Steele Children’s Research Center
The UA Steele Children’s Research Center is one of the prestigious Centers of Excellence within the UA College of Medicine - Tucson at the University of Arizona Health Sciences. It is the state’s only academic pediatric research center designated by the Arizona Board of Regents, and the only facility in Southern Arizona where researchers and physician-scientists are dedicated to advancing medical knowledge through basic and translational research to improve children’s health. As researchers, they seek to discover answers to children’s medical mysteries. As physician-scientists, they provide compassionate care to hospitalized patients at Banner Children’s – Diamond Children’s Medical Center and pediatric outpatient clinics throughout Tucson and the state. And, as faculty members with the UA Department of Pediatrics, they teach and train the next generation of pediatricians and researchers.

About Banner – University Medical Center Tucson and South
Banner – University Medical Center Tucson, nationally ranked as a Best Hospital by U.S. News and World Report, and Banner – University Medical Center South, are part of Banner – University Medicine, a premier academic medical network. These institutions are academic medical centers for the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson. Included on the two campuses are Diamond Children's Medical Center and many specialty clinics. The two academic medical centers are part of Arizona-based Banner Health, one of the largest nonprofit health care systems in the country, with 28 hospitals in six states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nebraska, Nevada and Wyoming. For more information, visit www.BannerHealth.com/UniversityTucson or www.bannerhealth.com/UniversitySouth