Second Annual National Day of Solidarity for Compassionate Patient Care

Tuesday, February 14, 2012 - 11:45am to 1:00pm
One year after the tragic shootings in Tucson on Jan. 8, 2011, medical schools and institutions across North America are again standing in solidarity and undertaking projects to pay tribute to all compassionate caregivers.
 
The second annual Solidarity Day for Compassionate Patient Care will be led by the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) chapter and the Program in Medical Humanities at the University of Arizona College of Medicine Tucson and Phoenix campuses on Tuesday, Feb. 14. Morning activities will culminate in an event for AHSC faculty and staff from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., on the Arizona Health Sciences Center Plaza (just south of the medical school), 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson. The national GHHS organization initiated Solidarity Day last year following the shootings in Tucson.
 
“With 92 chapters in U.S. and Canadian medical schools, the Gold Humanism Honor Society is a force for humanism in medicine and patient-centered care,” says Andreas Theodorou, MD, GHHS member and adviser to the GHHS chapter at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson. Top medical students, residents and faculty members are chosen for membership for demonstrating empathy, compassion, altruism, integrity and service.
 
During the morning of Feb. 14, Tucson GHHS members will deliver baskets with information about GHHS Solidarity Day, ribbons, candies and cards to units throughout The University of Arizona Medical Center – University Campus (1501 N. Campbell Ave.) and The University of Arizona Medical Center – South Campus (2800 E. Ajo Way). Staff, faculty and students will be asked to write the names of colleagues who demonstrate humanism in medicine, with descriptions of the humanistic acts, on cards which will be pinned on large display boards on the AHSC Plaza during the event. “We want to celebrate the many humanistic acts performed here every day,” notes Dr. Theodorou, who also is chief medical officer for The University of Arizona Medical Center – University Campus and professor and associate chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the UA College of Medicine.
 
At 11:45 a.m. on the AHSC Plaza, medical and health sciences students, faculty and staff will join hands to form a “human chain” as a symbolic display of standing in solidarity for compassionate patient care. Banners with the seven attributes of humanism in medicine – integrity, excellence, compassion, altruism, respect, empathy and service – will be arranged in a circle and attendees will be asked to stand near the attribute they most exemplify.
 
Representing the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix will be Howard D. Silverman, MD, adviser to the GHHS chapter at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix and associate dean, information resources and educational technology. Several Phoenix medical students also will be in Tucson to take part in the human chain.
 
The event will feature a choral performance by DOC-Apella, a musical group of UA medical students, and readings of poetry and cards from the display boards by representatives from Art Aloud, a program of the UA College of Medicine Program in Medical Humanities (http://humanities.medicine.arizona.edu).
 
About the Gold Humanism Honor Society
 
The Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) recognizes individuals who are exemplars of humanistic patient care. The power of the organization brings them together to sustain their own humanism and to inspire and nurture humanism in others. Begun in 2002, GHHS has 95 medical school chapters and more than 13,000 members. GHHS is an initiative of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation. For more information about GHHS visit www.humanism-in-medicine/ghhs.org
 
About the Arnold P. Gold Foundation
 
The Arnold P. Gold Foundation is dedicated to improving the quality of health and patient care by enhancing the doctor-patient relationship. Its work encourages the development of physicians who combine high tech, cutting edge medical science with the high touch skills of communication, empathy and compassion. Find out more at www.humanism-in-medicine.org