Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology Helping To Attract Outstanding Faculty to

Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology Helping To Attract Outstanding Faculty to

Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology Helping To Attract Outstanding Faculty to UA

The University of Arizona's new Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology (IBSB) is paying off on a promise to attract new, outstanding faculty to campus. Take Rod Wing, PhD, as an example.
Dr. Wing is an internationally recognized plant scientist whose work involves unraveling the genetic codes of agricultural crops like corn, rice, cotton and soybeans. Earlier this year he agreed to bring his research programs to the UA College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. IBSB helped fund the move. IBSB Director Thomas Baldwin, PhD, calculates that Dr. Wing's hire brings an immediate $4 million in research grants to the University. And since agreeing to come to the UA, Dr. Wing has submitted an additional $16 million in grant applications, Dr. Baldwin said.

Biophysicist Michael Hogan, PhD, is actually the first UA faculty scientist hired by IBSB. Dr. Hogan is an expert in DNA microarray technology, which helps researchers study the genetic workings of thousands of DNA samples all contained on a surface the size of a postage stamp. Dr. Hogan's other specialty is technology transfer -- building for-profit companies out of the ideas and techniques generated in research labs.

The Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology currently employs, or shares with other academic units, 25 research and administrative staffers. The Institute is actively recruiting five more scientists. Within the next few years as many as 50 faculty members will move into laboratory and office space within a new 160,000-square-foot building. With just more than 115,000 square feet of net-assignable space, the building also will house core technology laboratories in areas like computational biology and imaging that will support genetic research.

IBSB is a collaboration involving the UA Colleges of Science, Agriculture and Life Sciences, Medicine, Engineering and Mines, and Pharmacy. Dr. Baldwin believes bringing scientists from different disciplines together with cutting-edge technology will create the environment conducive to major conceptual advances. "Researchers will interact, discover, analyze and invent together," Dr. Baldwin said. "It is a climate for scientific breakthrough."

The Institute for Biomedical Science and Biotechnology is dedicated to creating a climate that facilitates the advancement of high-technology molecular life sciences research to improve human health and well being and to stimulate biology-based industrial development in Arizona.