Lori Arviso Alvord, MD, First Navajo Woman Surgeon and Author of `The Scapel and the Silver Bear,' to Speak at two AHSC Events, Feb. 25 & 26

<p>Lori Arviso Alvord, MD, First Navajo Woman Surgeon to Speak at two AHSC Events, Feb. 25 &amp; 26</p>

Lori Arviso Alvord, MD, First Navajo Woman Surgeon and Author of `The Scapel and the Silver Bear,' to Speak at two AHSC Events, Feb. 25 & 26

EVENT: Use of Psychoneuroimmunology and Sustainability Theory In Navajo Ceremonies to Create Health Environments
Second Annual Stoklos Visiting Professorship, Mel and Enid Arizona College of Public Health
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, Feb. 25, 12-1 p.m.

PLACE: Room 8403, University Medical Center, 1501 N. Campbell Ave.

CONTACT: Aleena Hernandez, (520) 318-7280


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EVENT: Navajo Ceremonies: A Blueprint for Healing Environments and Wellness Models
Erik Shea Olbin-Lingel Visiting Professorship, UA Department of Surgery Grand Rounds
DATE/TIME: Wednesday, Feb. 26, 7-8 a.m.

PLACE: Room 5403, University Medical Center, 1501 N. Campbell Ave.

CONTACT: Jo Marie Gellerman, (520) 626-7219

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: Although these presentations are geared for health care professionals, the public and news media are invited to attend. Both events are free of charge. Dr. Alvord is available for interviews prior to the events by phone, or in person immediately after the presentations. Contact Jo Marie Gellerman at (520) 626-7219 to arrange interviews.


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A member of the Navajo Tribe, Lori Arviso Alvord, MD, is associate dean of Student and Multicultural Affairs at Dartmouth Medical School. She also is assistant professor of surgery and a board-certified practicing general surgeon. She earned her undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College (1979, cum laude), and received her medical degree from Stanford University (1985). Her surgical residency was fulfilled at Stanford University Hospital, where she finished as chief resident in 1991. For the next six years, she worked for the Indian Health Service (a division of the U.S. Public Health Service) in Gallup, N.M., providing health care to members of the Navajo and Zuni tribes.
"The Scalpel and the Silver Bear" (Bantam, 1999), her autobiography, tells the story of her journey from the reservation to become a surgeon and her work to combine Navajo philosophies of healing with western medicine. Married to Jonathan Alvord, Lori has two children, Kodiak and Kaitlyn, and lives in Enfield, N.H.

Dr. Alvord has received numerous awards, including an honorary degree of Doctor of Science Honoris Causa from Albany Medical College, the Sirridge "Outstanding Women in Medicine" Award from the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, and the Governor's Award for Outstanding Women from the State of New Mexico.