UMC Vice President Marty Enriquez, RN, Graduates from Wharton Program for Nurse Executives

UMC Vice President Marty Enriquez, RN, Graduates from Wharton Program for Nurse Executives

UMC Vice President Marty Enriquez, RN, Graduates from Wharton Program for Nurse Executives

Marty Enriquez, RN, University Medical Center's vice president for patient care services, graduated in June from the Johnson & Johnson - Wharton Fellows Program in Management for Nurse Executives, an intensive three-week management education program held at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Ms. Enriquez was one of 41 senior nurse executives selected to participate in the program, which provides participants with critical business and management knowledge. This year's participants are from the United States, Canada, Australia, and Singapore.

"I loved my Wharton experience. It was highly interactive, and I feel I learned a great deal. I have been given new tools which will allow me to be a better administrator as I make decisions for the well-being of our patients and our hospital," Ms. Enriquez said.


The Johnson & Johnson - Wharton Fellows Program has been enhancing the leadership capabilities of nurse executives for 22 years. The program recognizes the important role of nurse executives in strategic planning within their own health care institutions, as well as influencing health policy regionally, nationally and globally. The input and influence of nurse executives take on added significance today, given the serious nursing shortage that threatens the quality of health care in the U.S. and abroad.

"Due to the tremendous marketplace pressures in today's health-care organizations, the voice of the clinician can easily be lost," says Gregory P. Shea, Ph.D., academic director, Johnson & Johnson - Wharton Fellows Program. "This program helps nurse executives become well-versed in a wide variety of organizational, financial and marketplace issues. By strengthening their management and leadership capabilities, they can more readily assume the role of full strategic partner with other health-care executives."

Participating nurses are competitively selected to study strategic, financial, managerial, and leadership approaches to organizational development at The Wharton School in conjunction with the University of Pennsylvania's Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. During the program's Executive Forum, nurse executives collaborate with the chief executive officers of their own health care institutions to analyze the role of nursing in hospital management, plan program strategies, and introduce new perspectives.

Established in 1881 by Philadelphia industrialist and philanthropist Joseph Wharton, The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania was the world's first collegiate business school. The Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI) is the center of the University of Pennsylvania's activities and programs in health services research, health policy, and health care management executive education.