UA College of Medicine-Phoenix Department of Basic Medical Sciences Appointments

Five new basic science faculty members have joined The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partnership with Arizona State University
PHOENIX – Five new basic science faculty members have joined The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix in partnership with Arizona State University.

Trent Anderson, PhD, Chad Foradori, PhD, Kurt Gustin, PhD, Taben Mary Hale, PhD, and Cynthia Standley, PhD, are new members of the Basic Medical Sciences Department at the expansion of The University of Arizona medical school in downtown Phoenix.

Dr. Trent Anderson comes to Arizona via the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University, after having originally obtained his PhD in anatomy and cell biology with a specialization in neuroanatomy from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Anderson's scholarly research is in the area of neuroexcitability, with an emphasis on diseases at the extremes of excitability, namely seizure disorder and Parkinson's disease. He is teaching clinical anatomy as an assistant professor at the College of Medicine – Phoenix.

Dr. Chad Foradori was recruited from Colorado State University and received his PhD in neuroscience at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Foradori's translational research is in the area of reproductive neurobiology. As a research assistant professor, he will investigate endogenous opioid peptides, androgens and estrogen receptor beta in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, with the goal of understanding behavioral aspects of neuroendocrinology at the molecular level.

Dr. Kurt Gustin, formerly of the Department of Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at the University of Idaho, joins the Department of Basic Medical Sciences as an associate professor. Dr. Gustin earned his doctorate in microbiology and immunology from the University of Michigan and performed postdoctoral work in microbiology and immunology at Stanford University. The foci of his research are RNA viruses, such as rhinovirus and poliovirus, and nanomaterials in basic and applied cell pathobiology. Dr. Gustin will teach microbial pathogenesis in the Infectious Disease Block of the medical curriculum.


Dr. Taben Hale comes to Arizona via the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Montreal, after having obtained her PhD in pharmacology and toxicology from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Hale's scholarly research is in the areas of cardiovascular pharmacology and vascular sexual medicine, specifically the effects of antihypertensive drugs on vascular structure and erectile function. An assistant professor in the Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Dr. Hale will be teaching pharmacology and physiology at the Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

Dr. Cynthia Standley has taught medical students for the past 15 years at Wayne State University and at osteopathic medical schools in the Phoenix area, after having earned her doctorate in physiology with a specialization in neuroscience from Wayne State in Detroit. Her scholarly research areas include preeclampsia, a serious disorder in pregnant women, hypertension, neuroprotective and other health benefits of magnesium, and the influence of sex hormones on seizure disorder. Dr. Standley joins the Basic Medical Sciences faculty as a research professor and will teach physiology, specifically renal, pulmonary and neurophysiology, as well as women's health, in the medical curriculum.

The four-year medical school campus in Phoenix is an expansion of the UA program begun in 1992 to provide third- and fourth-year medical students the opportunity to complete their clinical rotations at Phoenix-area teaching hospitals. The first class of 24 medical students admitted to the full, four-year program began in August 2007. A second class of 48 first-year students began classes in August 2008.