Three-Organ Transplant Baby Leaves UMC Tomorrow

"The 1-year-old girl from Gilbert, Arizona, who successfully received a three-organ multi-visceral transplant on Nov. 9 at University Medical Center is leaving the hospital tomorrow."

The 1-year-old girl from Gilbert, Arizona, who successfully received a three-organ multi-visceral transplant on Nov. 9 at University Medical Center is leaving the hospital tomorrow, Thursday, Dec. 17 at 3:00 p.m.


The first procedure of its kind performed in Arizona and the Southwestern United States, Adrianna Martinez’s transplant included the liver, small bowel, and pancreas from a deceased baby donor transplanted “en bloc” (kept together as a single unit) in a seven-hour operation, a complex procedure that is rarely performed and requires superb logistical, surgical and medical coordination.

Adrianna was born without a small bowel, a rare congenital malformation that makes it impossible to digest food. She also was born with situs inversus – her abdominal organs were positioned on the wrong side – making her condition even more complex.


While Adrianna will not have to spend Christmas at UMC, she is not ready to return to her home in Gilbert.


“Adrianna looks good,” said Khalid Khan, MBChB, MRCP, associate professor of surgery and a gastroenterologist specializing in pediatric liver and intestine transplants. “But she will have to come back to the hospital regularly for the next few weeks to be monitored for rejection.”
John Renz, MD, PhD, professor of surgery and vice-chief of abdominal transplantation, added, “I’m happy to say the baby is doing well and the family is very pleased that we were able to provide this new service at the University of Arizona.”
In addition to a long history of heart, lung, kidney, pancreas and liver transplants, the UMC Transplant Program performed its first living-donor and first deceased intestine transplants for small bowel syndrome and first auto-islet cell transplants for chronic pancreatitis earlier this year.


“We are delighted with Adrianna’s progress,” said Rainer Gruessner, MD, professor and chairman of the UA Department of Surgery and chief of transplantation at UMC. “We continue to achieve levels of excellence in transplant surgery for our patients in Arizona by offering life-saving transplant options for children and adults with intestinal failure and liver dysfunction.”