University of Arizona Researchers, Others Take on Project To Help Institutions Use Comparative Effectiveness Research

Researchers on the project will first assess how Pharmacy and Therapeutics committees currently implement comparative effectiveness research in their decision-making processes.
Tucson, AZ -- Researchers from the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, collaborating with experts from pharmacy professional organizations and the University of Utah, will receive $1.25 million from the federal Agency on Healthcare Research and Quality over the next three years to study innovative methods for encouraging the use of comparative effectiveness research by healthcare institutions.
 
Daniel Malone, PhDComparative effectiveness research provides evidence on the effectiveness, benefits, and harmful effects of different treatment options. The evidence is generated from research studies that compare drugs, medical devices, tests, surgeries, or ways to deliver health care. Daniel Malone, PhD, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science at the UA College of Pharmacy, heads the project.
 
Researchers on the project will first assess how Pharmacy and Therapeutics committees currently implement comparative effectiveness research in their decision-making processes.
 
“Then we’ll develop a P & T training program on using comparative information, and evaluate the impact of these training programs on clinical programs, formulary processes and formularies.” Malone says. “The overall goal is to increase awareness and use of comparative effectiveness research reports by P & T committees.”
 
In addition to Malone, the investigators on the research project from the UA College of Pharmacy are Lisa Hines, PharmD; Jason Hurwitz, PhD; and Terri Warholak, PhD. Collaborating on the project are Diana Brixner, PhD, of the University of Utah College of Pharmacy; Daniel J. Cobaugh, PharmD, of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation; and Marissa Schlaifer, MS, of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy.
 
The grant was made possible through funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the federal stimulus legislation.