Drs. Richard Carmona and Peter Rhee to Speak at “Strong Minds, Healing Hands, Compassionate Hearts” Dinner and Art Auction, Sept. 9

Fundraiser celebrates more than 40 years of supporting the development of health-care professionals by the UA College of Medicine Office of Outreach and Multicultural Affairs
Richard H. Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS, 17th Surgeon General of the United States, and Peter M. Rhee, MD, MPH, FACS, FCCM, DMCC, chief of trauma, critical care and emergency surgery and professor of surgery at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, will speak at “Strong Minds, Healing Hands, Compassionate Hearts” – a fundraising dinner and art auction – on Friday, Sept. 9, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., in the UA Student Union Memorial Center Ballroom, 1303 E. University Blvd., on the UA Main Campus, Tucson.
 
This ticketed event celebrates more than 40 years of supporting the development of health-care professionals by the Office of Outreach and Multicultural Affairs (OMA) at the UA College of Medicinein Tucson and Phoenix and is presented by the OMA Community Advisory Board. Proceeds will support OMA’s student programs, including Med-Start, a program that was launched in 1969 to encourage Arizona high school students to pursue health-care careers.
 
Art may be previewed in anticipation of the auction from 4 to 6 p.m. Dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m. with a program at 7 p.m. and an art auction beginning at 8 p.m.
 
Dr. Rhee will provide the program’s opening remarks. “I am honored and delighted to be a part of this wonderful event,” he says. “As a public servant it is a privilege and one’s duty to help the community.  The UA College of Medicine plays a vital role in serving Arizona’s health care needs.”
 
Dr. Carmona will deliver the keynote address, “Be All You Can Be: The Power of Possibility.” “The only easy day was yesterday,” he notes.
 
Works by more than 20 local artists – including David Tineo, Alfred Quiroz, Juan Enriquez, John Salgado and Ceci Garcia – will be auctioned. The artists are affiliated with the Raices Taller Art Gallery & Workshop (http://raicestaller222.webs.com), Tucson's only Latino-based contemporary nonprofit cooperative art gallery and workshop. The works currently are on exhibit in the art show, “Strong Minds, Healing Hands, Compassionate Hearts,” through Friday, Sept. 9, at the UA Student Union Memorial Center, Union Gallery (Level 3). Gallery hours are Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, noon to 6 p.m., and Thursdays, noon to 8 p.m. (The exhibit is free and open to the public.)
 
The evening also will include a blessing ceremony by Carlos Gonzales, MD, UA associate professor of family medicine, who attended Med-Start, OMA’s summer program for high school students, in 1972. Dr. Gonzales and other Med-Start alumni will be honored during the event.
 
Tickets are $60 per person, $100 per couple. Reservations are requested by Thursday, Sept. 1. For more information and to reserve tickets, please contact Dr. Sofia Ramos, event chair, (520) 471-1995, or email sramos@email.arizona.edu (Those who are unable to attend the dinner/auction but would like to make a tax-deductible donation should contact Jennifer Potter, (520) 626-2271, email jpotter@azcc.arizona.edu)
 
The UA plays a vital role in preparing doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other health-care professionals to meet the needs of our community, and the College of Medicine’s Office of Outreach and Multicultural Affairs supports the health-care workforce pipeline through programs that provide educational assistance from middle school through professional school and beyond,” says Ana María López, MD, MPH, FACP, associate dean for outreach and multicultural affairs and director at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson. “We are committed to preparing students to be health-care professionals who exemplify ‘Strong Minds, Healing Hands, Compassionate Hearts.’”
 
For more than 40 years, OMA’s Med-Start summer program has provided more than a thousand Arizona high school students with health career exploration opportunities. Additional OMA programs include undergraduate internships, graduate fellowships and virtual and on-site workshops covering such topics as admission to health professional school, the medical school admission process, mock interviews and mock Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) sessions.
 
For more information about OMA, visit the website www.diversity.medicine.arizona.edu
 
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About Dr. Carmona
 
Dr. Richard CarmonaRichard H. Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS, was born to a poor Hispanic family in New York City. He experienced homelessness, hunger and health disparities during his youth. The experiences greatly sensitized him to the relationships among culture, health, education and economic status and shaped his future. A high school dropout at age 17, Dr. Carmona’s resume includes being a medic, registered nurse, hospital CEO, police and fire department medical director, trauma surgeon, SWAT team leader, U.S. Army Special Forces soldier and university professor. He also is the founding director of Arizona’s first regional trauma care system.  After being nominated as 17th U.S. Surgeon General in 2002, he was unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate.
 
Today, Dr. Carmona is vice chairman of Canyon Ranch, CEO of Canyon Ranch Health division, and president of Canyon Ranch Institute. He is a distinguished professor of public health at the UA Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health and UA professor of surgery and pharmacy.  He also has dozens of professional affiliations and serves on the boards of directors of several national corporations.
 
Everything Dr. Carmona has done in his life has contributed to where he is today. A charismatic speaker with an unsurpassed passion for prevention, Dr. Carmona’s message about eliminating health disparities, improving health literacy and addressing global health resonates with all Americans.
 
About Dr. Rhee
 
Dr.Peter RheePeter Rhee, MD, MPH, FACS, FCCM, DMCC, is chief of trauma, critical care and emergency surgery and professor of surgery at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He also is vice chair for clinical affairs in the college’s Department of Surgery. Previously, Dr. Rhee held appointments as director of the Navy Trauma Training Center, attending surgeon at Los Angeles County Medical Center, professor of surgery at the University of Southern California and professor of surgery at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS). 
 
Dr. Rhee received a bachelor of science degree in health systems engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology (summa cum laude, 1983), a medical degree from USUHS (1987), a master’s in public health in health services from the University of Washington (1995) and a diploma in the medical care of catastrophes from the Society of Apothecaries of London (1999). He completed his internship in surgery at Balboa Naval Hospital (1987-1988) and his residency in general surgery at the University of California at Irvine (1988-1992). Dr. Rhee also completed a fellowship in trauma and critical care at the University of Washington’s Harborview Medical Center (1993-1995). 
 
Dr. Rhee is a retired U.S. Navy captain following 24 years of active duty. He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a Fellow of Critical Care Medicine, as well as a member of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, Western Trauma Association, the Society of University Surgeons, the Association for Academic Surgery, the Society of Critical Care and the Shock Society. He also is a member of the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. He serves on numerous national and university committees and is a member of numerous editorial boards. Dr. Rhee also has authored or co-authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters. He also serves on national steering committees and national trauma research committees, including the Drug Safety and Monitoring Board and the protocol review board for the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium.
 
His areas of research interest include suspended animation for trauma, hemostatic agents, resuscitation immunology and formulation of resuscitation fluids, trauma training, and advanced portable electronic medical devices including ones for communication and documentation.
 
About Dr. Gonzales
 
Dr. Carlos R. GonazalesCarlos R. Gonzales, MD, graduated from the UA College of Medicine in 1981. One of the early Med-Start participants (1972), today Dr. Gonzales is an associate professor with the UA College of Medicine Department of Family and Community Medicine, an award-winning family practice physician and a leader in addressing the challenges of border health issues. He recalls that as a student at Pueblo High School, he dreamed about going into medicine, but it was just a dream. Med-Start helped him realize that being part of the medical profession was possible, he says, and he became the first in his family to go on to college. “Med-Start motivated me,” he notes. “Without Med-Start, it wouldn’t have happened.”
 
About Med-Start
 
Just two years after opening its doors to the first class of medical students in 1967, the UA College of Medicine in Tucson welcomed a group of about 20 high school students who came to the campus to attend the first Med-Start summer program, developed to improve health care in rural and economically disadvantaged areas and to increase the number of minority health-care professionals in Arizona. Since it was launched in 1969, several thousand students have participated in Med-Start. In 2004, Med-Start expanded to the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix campus.
 
The Med-Start cause was championed by a group of idealistic and innovative minority medical students – including Marcos Duarte, Ruth Smothers and Yuel Tom, all of whom later completed their medical degrees at the UA. In 1968, they received the support of UA College of Medicine Founding Dean Merlin K. “Monte” DuVal, MD. The late Dr. DuVal probably is best remembered for his role in shaping the fledgling College, providing support for numerous programs and initiatives that have contributed to recognition of the College as one of the top medical schools in the West. After his death in 2006, generous gifts from family and friends established The Merlin K. “Monte” DuVal Memorial Med-Start Endowment, which pays tribute to the founding dean while supporting this vital program.
 
“The real magic of Med-Start is revealed in the personal stories of career success,” says Patricia Rodríguez, associate director of the Office of Outreach and Multicultural Affairs at the UA College of Medicine - Phoenix. “Whether the youth who have benefited from Med-Start became direct-care providers or chose career paths outside of the health professions, many have had a tremendous impact on the lives of others.”
 
Today, in addition to the Tucson and Phoenix summer programs, Med-Start promotes youth exploration of health careers year-round – through tours of the Arizona Health Sciences Center, high school career days, student health events and other activities.
 
Med-Start alumni who have pursued medical careers include:
 
Ÿ Mariana Amaya, MD (1992), graduated from the UA College of Medicine in 2001 and practices obstetrics and gynecology in Phoenix. (Dr. Amaya also participated in the UA Minority Medical Education Program in 1994.)
 
Ÿ Ernestine Bustamante, MD (1988), graduated from the UA College of Medicine in 1997 and practices obstetrics and gynecology in Chandler.
 
Ÿ Evelinda Gonzales (2002), a member of the UA College of Medicine Class of 2012, is the daughter of Dr. Carlos Gonzales (see above).
 
Ÿ Larry Oñate, MD (1978), graduated from the UA College of Medicine in 1989 and is a psychiatrist in Tucson.
 
Ÿ Celida Rangel, MD (1990), graduated from the UA College of Medicine in 2002 and is a pediatrician in Phoenix.
 
About Raices Taller 222 Art Gallery & Workshop
 
Raices Taller 222 Art Gallery & Workshop is Tucson's only Latino-based contemporary nonprofit cooperative art gallery and workshop. The member-based cooperative community of working artists is dedicated to promoting solidarity, synergy and opportunities for individual artists’ growth. The organization offers venues and physical resources that allow creative expression from individual members while encouraging understanding and appreciation of art through community outreach to children and adults. Through this partnership of artists and community, art and the creative process are made available to those who might not otherwise have access to it through other more traditional methods. For more information, visit the website http://raicestaller222.webs.com