‘Art of Healing: Development of the Virtual Feeling Arts System and Application to a Hospice Care Program,’ Dec. 11

Free multimedia presentation and dialogue, open to the public, on the expressive arts, healing, and the end-of-life journey, with special guests from the Feeling Arts Academy, Japan.

The University of Arizona College of Nursing, in collaboration with the Arizona Center on Aging, is offering a multimedia presentation and dialogue on the expressive arts, healing and the end-of-life journey, with special guests from the Feeling Arts Academy, Japan.

Featured artist, Yoshihiro Kitamura, and Takayuki Yoshioka, PhD, will present “Art of Healing: Development of the Virtual Feeling Arts System and Application to a Hospice Care Program.”

This community program will take place on Wednesday, Dec. 11, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in Room 105 at the UA College of Nursing. This event is free and open to the public.

The “Art of Healing” presentation is part of a study of progressive hospice programs and holistic palliative care. The multimedia presentation is a collaborative work between the creator and viewers in which the artist uses a unique technique of casting light on abstract paintings to elicit a healing response. The lights and images are enhanced with soothing music, a meditative interplay of light and sound. The multi-sensory experience is designed to evoke unique individual responses within a single harmonious space.

“I firmly believe that deep emotion gives people power to live,” says Kitamura of the healing aspect of the experience. “The art inspires patients and families who are in great pain and distress, giving them the power to acknowledge and accept the way they are. Once they become at peace with themselves, their suffering eases and they regain the power to live, which helps speed up the natural healing process. The key to healing, I believe, is to accept the way you are and to live in harmony with the negative aspects within. This is something that I have been trying to express with my artwork. Space is made up not only of light but also of shadow. Harmony is not just about beauty, it is about the coexistence of light and shadow. All forms of art have healing power, but what makes this art different from other forms of art is that it does not reflect the creator’s message or story. Practically, the art has different meanings to different people, enabling everyone to reflect their own feelings on the art.”

For more information on this event, please contact Marilyn Gilbert at the Arizona Center on Aging at (520) 270-2440 or mgilbert@aging.arizona.edu.

Flyer:
Art of Healing: Development of the Virtual Feeling Arts System and Application to a Hospice Care Program