White Coat Ceremony, Class of 2020, UA College of Medicine - Tucson

The 22nd annual ceremony marks the students’ entrance into the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson.

EVENT: WHITE COAT CEREMONY, CLASS OF 2020, UA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE – TUCSON
The 22nd annual ceremony marks the students’ entrance into the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson.

Bruce M. Coull, MD, UA professor of neurology and medicine, will deliver the keynote address, “Fifty Steps in Four Years: Professionalism on the Road to Becoming a Doctor.”

DATE/TIME: FRIDAY, JULY 29, 5-6:30 P.M.

LOCATION:  Centennial Hall
1020 E. University Blvd., UA Main Campus, Tucson

TUCSON, Ariz. – The largest class ever admitted to the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson – 135 students – will celebrate their entrance into medical school at the College’s 22nd annual White Coat Ceremony, on Friday, July 29, 5 to 6:30 p.m., in Centennial Hall, 1020 E. University Blvd., on the UA Main Campus.

Open only to family and friends of incoming medical students, not the general public, the ceremony may be viewed live on the Internet at http://streaming.biocom.arizona.edu

The ceremony is designed to honor new medical students as they accept the responsibility of the doctor-patient relationship. Each student will receive their first white coat and a stethoscope, thanks to the generosity of UA College of Medicine – Tucson alumni, faculty and friends.

In addition, each white coat has a Humanism in Medicine pin that symbolizes a shared commitment to providing compassionate and competent patient care. The pins are provided as a gift from the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, initiators of the first White Coat Ceremony in 1993. (The UA College of Medicine in Tucson was one of the earliest U.S. medical schools to adopt the ceremony, holding its first White Coat Ceremony in July 1995.)

Bruce M. Coull, MD, UA professor of neurology and medicine, will deliver the keynote address, “Fifty Steps in Four Years: Professionalism on the Road to Becoming a Doctor.”

Students in the Class of 2020 include:

  • A graduate of the UA P-MAP (Pre-Medical Admissions Pathway) program whose family fled Kenya and lived in a refugee camp for 17 years
  • A Navajo student who worked with Johns Hopkins University Center for American Indian Health to build communication with Native American patients
  • A graduate of the UA James E. Rogers College of Law who worked with immigration and family advocacy law and the rights of indigenous people
  • A nurse who grew up in Togo and supported herself through college
  • Five students pursuing dual medical and doctoral degrees in the UA College of Medicine – Tucson’s MD-PhD Program, designed to train students planning careers in academic medicine or biomedical research. Completion of both degrees typically takes seven to eight years: the first two at medical school, then completion of graduate course work and dissertation research, followed by two years of medical school clinical requirements.
  • Eleven graduates of the UA College of Medicine – Tucson’s P-MAP (Pre-Medical Admissions Pathway) program. Increasing diversity in the health-care workforce is a top priority nationally, and has been identified as a key factor to address health disparities and ensure the adequate provision of culturally competent care to our nation. The UA College of Medicine – Tucson’s commitment to training students who are inclined to help address the dramatic health disparities encountered by underserved communities – including reservations and rural and border communities – is illustrated by P-MAP, launched in 2014. The one-year program, which includes a master’s degree in cellular and molecular medicine, is open to Arizona residents who have not had the educational and economic experiences that help students get admitted to medical school, but whose diverse life experiences and skills – and their academic records – make them outstanding candidates. Preference is given to those who are first-generation college students; who grew up in rural or border communities, or are registered members of federally recognized tribes.

Facts about the UA College of Medicine – Tucson Class of 2020:

  • Applications received: 6,458
  • Students enrolled: 135
  • Demographics: 74 women and 61 men. Underrepresented minorities make up 35 percent of the class.
  • Arizona residents: 92 students (68 percent of the incoming class)
  • Average GPA: 3.63
  • Average science GPA: 3.54
  • Have graduate degrees: 37 percent
  • Graduated from the University of Arizona: 51 (undergraduates)

About the UA College of Medicine – Tucson

The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson is advancing health and wellness through state-of-the-art medical education programs, groundbreaking research, and advancements in patient care in Arizona and across the United States. Founded in 1967, the College ranks among the top medical schools in the nation for research and primary care and is leading the way in academic medicine through its partnership with Banner – University Medicine, a new division of one of the largest nonprofit health-care systems in the country. For more information: http://medicine.arizona.edu

About the University of Arizona Health Sciences

The University of Arizona Health Sciences is the statewide leader in biomedical research and health professions training. The UA Health Sciences includes the UA Colleges of Medicine (Phoenix and Tucson), Nursing, Pharmacy and Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, with main campus locations in Tucson and the growing Phoenix Biomedical Campus in downtown Phoenix. From these vantage points, the UA Health Sciences reaches across the state of Arizona and the greater Southwest to provide cutting-edge health education, research, patient care and community outreach services. A major economic engine, the UA Health Sciences employs almost 5,000 people, has nearly 1,000 faculty members and garners more than $126 million in research grants and contracts annually. For more information: http://uahs.arizona.edu